“Mystery Novelists Ronald Balson, William Kent Kreuger to Appear at Frugal Muse Books in October” by S.M. O’Connor

Next month, Frugal Muse Books Music & Video in Darien, Illinois will host mystery novelists Ronald Balson and William Kent Kreuger.  Ronald H. Balson, author of Once We Were Brothers, Saving Sophie, and Karolina’s Twins, will speak at Frugal Muse Books on Monday, October 2, 2017 about his latest book in the series, The Trust.   Two weeks later, Frugal Muse Books will host “An Evening New York Times Bestselling Crime Fiction Author William Kent Kreuger” on the night of Wednesday, October 18, 2017.

In The Trust, private investigator Liam Taggart – the hero of Balson’s three previous novels – returns to his hometown in Northern Ireland for his uncle’s funeral only to discover his relative may not have died of natural causes.  Balson is an attorney and adjunct professor who has an interesting story to tell because he self-published his first novel and it sold 100,000 copies.  He will answer questions and signs copies of his new book.  The event will be from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  Free refreshments will be served.

Published by Atria Books in 2017, Sulfur Springs: A Novel is the fifteenth book in Kreuger’s Cork O’Connor series.  The hero, Corcoran “Cork” O’Connor, is part Irish (obviously) and part Ojibwe.  The character went from being a cop on the South Side of Chicago to being sheriff of Tamarack County in northern Minnesota (where most of the books are set) to being a private investigator.  Sulfur Springs sees Cork and his bride, Rainy, travel from the woodlands of rural Minnesota to the desert of rural Arizona to find out why her son, Peter, called her to confess to a murder and then disappeared.

Mr. Kreuger will be at the superstore to talk about his new mystery novel Sulfur Springs and sign copies of the book.  The event will be from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  This is a free event.  One should order the book in advance to guarantee seating.

Frugal Muse Books is located in Chestnut Court Shopping Center at the intersection of 75th Street and Lemont Road.  The address is 7511 Lemont Road, Darien, Illinois.  The phone number is (630) 427-1140.

RHBpic

Figure 1 Ronald H. Balson is an attorney, adjunct professor, and novelist.

William Kent KrugerFigure 2 Born in Oregon in 1950, William Kent Kreuger briefly attended Stanford University before he left due to radical leftist activities.  [Amongst other things, he was one of the students who occupied the president’s office to protest Stanford’s “complicity in weapons production during the Vietnam War.”]  By the time he lost his academic scholarship, he had fallen in love with a girl from Nebraska named Diane, so he moved there for her.  He supported himself and his growing family as a logger, construction worker, and free-lance journalist before he began to research childhood development at the University of Minnesota and turned his hand toward writing fiction.  His last seven novels have been New York Times Bestsellers.

Sulfur-Spring-Cover-High-ResFigure 3 Sulfur Springs is the latest novel in William Kent Kreuger’s Cork O’Connor series of mystery novels.  He will make two appears in Illinois to promote the book in the course of a Midwestern tour: Frugal Muse Books in Darien, Illinois on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. and The Book Stall in Winnetka, Illinois on Sunday, October 22, 2017 at 2:00 p.m.

MANITOU-CANYONFigure 4 Published in 2016, Manitou Canyon sees private detective Cork O’Connor go looking for a missing man days before his own daughter is due to get married.  When he disappears himself, his family flies on a floatplane to the lake where the missing man was last seen to look for Cork only to find blood at his campsite.  Hundreds of lives are at stake.

ordinary grace coverFigure 5 Published in 2013, Ordinary Grace won the Edgar® Award for Best Novel.  Forty years late, Frank Drum looks back on the summer of 1961, when he was thirteen years old and tragedy struck his parents, elder sister, and brother.

Kent-2017Figure 6 For years, William Kent Kreuger wrote short stories and novels at St. Clair Broiler restaurant in St. Paul, Minnesota.  He had to stop his daily routine when the family moved to a different neighborhood and sadly the restaurant is closing at the end of September.

Author-W.K.-KruegerFigure 7 William Kent Kreuger grew up in the Pacific Northwest, but moved to St. Paul, Minnesota in 1980, so his wife, Diane, could attend law school.  She made the Dean’s List her final year of law school despite having given birth to their second child the first semester of that school year.  Many of Kreuger’s novels are set in the North Woods of Minnesota.

Advertisements

“The Future Energy Exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry” by S.M. O’Connor

 

 

Future Energy Chicago is an interactive exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry designed to make visitors contemplate ways to make American society more energy-efficient.  Visitors began to preview the exhibit Future Energy Chicago at the Museum of Science and Industry (M.S.I.) on Wednesday, September 18, 2013.[1]  In a press release, the M.S.I. stated, “Using a state-of-the-art, multi-player visual simulation based on real-world data, Future Energy Chicago engages guests to explore creative solutions to our most critical energy challenges. Teams compete in five exciting and unique simulation activities to design a future car, future house, future neighborhood, future transportation network and future power grid for Chicago.”

“Our primary goal with Future Energy Chicago is to encourage and empower young people to envision their own role in our energy future,” stated David Mosena, President & Chief Executive Officer of the M.S.I. “We’ve developed this experience over three years with a host of independent, research-centered energy experts, and it has the depth to motivate both kids and adults to engage in an issue that affects all of us.”

Upon entry to the exhibit, visitors view a short film about energy in nature.  When the screening concludes, viewers enter the main feature of Future Energy Chicago is the Simulation Lab.  Here, Museum of Science and Industry facilitators welcome students on field trips and other guests and divide them into teams.  These teams play five games, “Future House,” “Future Neighborhood,” “Future Car,” “Future Power,” and “Future Transportation.”  Sieben Energy Associates helped the Museum of Science and Industry gather and interpret real-world data to create the scoring system for the larger Simulation Game comprised of the five smaller mini-games.

In “Future House,” the visitor fills the role of energy consultant.  The teams explores a virtual house to find ways to use technologies to make a Chicago house more energy-efficient without sacrificing comfort.

In “Future Neighborhood,” one has a chance to play urban planner.  The goal is to design a walkable neighborhood with homes, businesses, schools, stores, and entertainment venues to reduce how much time residents would need to spend in their cars to reach work, take their children to school, go shopping, and reach recreation points.

In “Future Car,” one plays the role of automotive engineer.  Experiment different engine types and automotive body materials to make a car more energy-efficient.  Then compare the theoretical car of tomorrow the team has designed to a real car one might find on the road today in the Energy Road Rally.

In “Future Power,” one gets to play energy engineer.  The goal for the team is to identify energy sources that can meet energy demand, while also reducing pollution and staying on budget.  Here, learn about the American energy grid.  What kind of power plant should one build, a coal-burning plant?  A nuclear power plant?  Natural gas?  Biomass?  Solar power?  Wind power?  Learn about emerging energy storage and carbon capture technologies.

In “Future Transportation,” the team’s goal is to design a public transportation grid that includes trains and buses, and bicycle paths.  Try to reduce inefficient, stress-inducing traffic jams.

The Museum of Science and Industry stated, in a press release, “Throughout the simulation, guests will compete in teams of up to six players, and rotate through five fast-paced games to design an energy-efficient future car and house, improve tomorrow’s neighborhood, and reinvent Chicago’s transportation and power generation systems. Along the way, their progress—measured by their ability to conserve energy—is tracked in ‘energy tanks’ on a 24-foot, visually rich scoreboard.”

In each game, guests are challenged to maximize energy efficiency while considering the various pros and cons of each choice they make—including cost, comfort and environmental factors. Along the way, new constraints and opportunities appear, compelling guests to consider various trade-offs and earn special badges that enhance their game scores.

For example, in Future Power, guests will begin the game by selecting energy sources to power the city of Chicago, but without any constraints for pollution. As the game progresses, new power sources appear, but pollution limits are also introduced and become progressively stricter.

Each of the games combines digital media with three-dimensional displays that enhance the realism of the simulation. In Future House, guests interact directly with a dimensional house that contains touch screen technology.

Touching various areas of the home, they determine the most energy-efficient changes to make: Which parts of the house use a lot of energy? Will different windows help? In Future Car, guests are automotive designers and engineers as they make selections—engine, paint color, stereo systems— that are projected onto a white model of a car so that their design takes shape before their eyes.

In the Energy Garden, visitors can ride a stationary bike, producing kinetic energy that transforms into electrical energy.  According to the Museum of Science and Industry, this powers “a dazzling array of visual effects, such as fire and water.”  Visitors can crank “a hand generator and activate an array of ‘plasma trees’ that energize the entire exhibit space.”  As visitors power with their own physical efforts a range of light bulbs, they can feel the difference in energy demand from an inefficient incandescent light bulb to an efficient LED light bulb.

The excitement and visual effects in the Energy Garden build, eventually triggering a transformation of the exhibit space that initiates the next experience: a six-minute, immersive film that celebrates the wonder of energy in our natural world, introduces guests to the global energy challenges we face and calls them to action, setting the stage for the heart of the Future Energy Chicago experience—the simulation game.

“This exhibit experience is incredibly unique,” stated Dr. Patricia Ward, who was then the Museum of Science and Industry’s Director of Science and Technology and is now Director of Science Exhibitions and Partnerships.  “We don’t know of another Museum that has created this kind of state-of-the-art simulation, and we are so excited to begin previewing it for guests and students.”

FutureEnergy_SciMinors_216__2_

Figure 1 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Students choose different power sources to fuel Chicago as they take on the role of power engineers in the “Future Power” game, part of the Future Energy Chicago exhibit at the M.S.I. The preview period for this exhibit began on Wednesday, September 18, 2013.

Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab
Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ The Museum of Science and Industry Chicago

Figure 2 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Visitors think like automotive engineers by designing energy-efficient vehicles in the “Future Car” simulation game in the exhibit Future Energy Chicago at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.

Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 3 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector Caption: Students play the “Future Car” simulation game.

Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 4 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: In the “Future Neighborhood” simulation game, one of five games in the Future Energy Chicago exhibit’s Game Simulation, guests design a walkable, energy-efficient neighborhood.

Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 5 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: A school group plays the “Future Neighborhood” game in the exhibit Future Energy Chicago at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.

FutureEnergy_SciMinors_264__2_

Figure 6 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: M.S.I. Facilitators break visitors into teams and teams rotate throughout five games in which players design an energy-efficient future car and house, improve tomorrow’s neighborhood, and reinvent Chicago’s transportation and power generation systems.

Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab
Future Energy Chicago Learning Lab @ The Museum of Science and Industry Chicago

Figure 7 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: In the “Future House” simulation game of the exhibit Future Energy Chicago, visitors experiment with ways to make houses more energy-efficient.

The Future Energy experience lasts approximately one hour and is not included in general admission. It requires an additional timed-entry ticket, which is available as part of a Museum’s Explorer ticket package.  Tickets are available online at www.msichicago.org/visit/tickets.  Show times begin at 10:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 2:45 p.m.  

Future Energy Chicago is the latest in a long line of energy exhibits and exhibitions at the M.S.I., including a working model of the tipple and other surface facilities of the Peabody Coal Company’s Mine Number 9 in Kincaid, Illinois; the Old Ben #17 Coal Mine; Petroleum; The Story of Flame Gas; Electricity & Our Future; Natural Gas Energy; and Energy Lab.  Further, in 1977, Doubleday & Company also published Where Are You Going with that Energy? by Roy Doty (1922-2015) and Leonard (“Len”) Maar, Jr. (1927-2016) under the auspices of the Museum of Science and Industry.  [This was part of a series of children’s books on science and technology Doty wrote for Doubleday and the M.S.I., all of which had titles that began with the question “Where Are You Going with…”] That same year, Doubleday also published, under the auspices of the Museum of Science and Industry, Electric Cars by E. John Waard and Aaron E. Klien.  This was a book for adults and teenagers on the history of electric cars, the state of electric cars in what was then the present time of the late 1970s, and speculations about the future of electric cars. Future Energy Chicago is made possible by the support of BP and the Exelon Foundation. Additional funding was provided by the Public Museum Capital Grants Program from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (I.D.N.R.) and the Illinois State Museum; Anonymous; Elizabeth Ruth Bakwin; The Aunt Marlene Foundation; and Edward M. Bakwin.

Starting on Tuesday, September 5, 2017, the Museum of Science and Industry will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Until Labor Day (Monday, September 4, 2017), the M.S.I. will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. [During peak periods, the M.S.I. is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.  On Sunday, September 24, 2017, the M.S.I. will be open from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.]  The Museum of Science and Industry is located in the northeast corner of Jackson Park in the neighborhood of Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago.  It stands on 57th Street at the intersection with Lake Shore Drive.  The address is 5700 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60637.  The phone number is (773) 684-1414.

 

[1] This is a revised and expanded version of an article I posted on Examiner.com Chicago in 2013.

“The Field Museum to Move SUE, Display Biggest Dinosaur Ever Discovered as Part of 125th Anniversary Celebrations” by S.M. O’Connor

In one of the largest private gifts ever to a Chicago museum, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex yet discovered, SUE, will be remounted in a more scientifically accurate way and move upstairs from Stanley Field Hall to the exhibit The Griffin Halls of Evolving Planet. Meanwhile, a touchable cast of the biggest dinosaur yet discovered, Patagotitan mayorum, will be installed in Stanley Field Hall, as part of The Field Museum’s 125th anniversary celebrations, thanks to a $16,500,000 gift from the Kenneth C. Griffin Charitable Trust.

“The Field Museum’s never-ending goal is to offer the best possible dinosaur experiences. Ken Grffin’s lomg-time support is a major step forward in achievening that goal,” stated Richard Lariviere, President of The Field Museum of Natural History.  “With this extraordinary gift from ken, we’ll be able to create a more scientifrically accurately and engaging homne for SUE the T red and welcome the world’s largest dinosaur to the Field.”

The cast made from the fossilized bones of Patagotitan mayorum (pronounced pat-uh-go-tie-tan my-or-um) will be installed near the African Elephant Group by Carl Ethan Akeley (1864-1926).  The Patagotitan mayorum was a colossal, long-necked herbivore found in modern Argentina.  From snout to tail tip, the cast streches 122 feet in length.  This is longer than two accordian Chicago Transit Authority (C.T.A.) buses would be if they were parked end-to-end.  The head will be twenty-eight feet off the floor.  The cast is so tall that a visitor standing on The Field Museum’s secnd-floor balcony will be able to come eye-to-eye with it.

The Patagotitan mayorum cast at The Field Museum will be mounted differently from the one at The Titanosaur at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.  The neck of The Field Museum’s Patagotitan mayorum cast will be extended higher off the floor.  It will also be different because it will be in one room, Stanley Field Hall, instead of being stretched out over two rooms.

A living Patagotitan mayorum probbaly weighed in the neighborhood of seventy tons.  By comparison, SUE is forty-two-feet-long and when she lived she probably weighed around nine tons.

The Patagotitan mayorum the was the sole known species of genus Patagotitan of titanosaurian sauropods.  Sauropods were quadripedal herbivors with small heads (relative the overall size of their bodies), long necks, and long tails.

José Carballido and Diego Pol led the team that discovered the Patagotitan mayorum in Chubut Province in Patagonia, Argentina.  They announced the discovery in 2017 and named the beast in 2017. Carballido and Pol copined the term Patagotitan as a portmonteau of Patagonia and Titan.  The Titans were gigantic gods in Greek mythology who were older than the gods of Olympus, and whom the gods of Olympus had to defeat.  [Many scholars believe this story reflects a memory of people who entered Greece having conquered another people already present.]  Mayoram is a reference to the ranching family who hosted the paleontologists.

Stanley Field Hall_temp working draft_not for releaseFigure 1 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of what the Patagotitan mayorum will look with the African Elephant Group by Carl Ethan Akeley (1864-1926) in The Field Museum of Natural History’s Stanley Field Hall.

The Patagotitan mayorum cast will be the only one in the world that visitors are able to touch and only the second cast in the world on display.  “Patagotitan is huge, and it’ll look right at home in Stanley Field Hall,” said Senior Exhibitions Project Manager Hilary Hansen.  “It’s a big, majestic space, which will be perfect backdrop for the world’s largest dinosaur.”

In February of 2018, SUE will come down from her mount.  The next spring, she will be unveiled in Evolving Planet.  The Patagotitan mayorum cast skeleton will go up in Stanley Field Hall in spring of 2018.  By late spring, the cast will be on display.  Real Patagotitan mayorum fossils will be on display alongside the cast skeleton, one of which will be an eight-foot-long thighbone.

Visitor and PatagotitanFigure 2 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of a visitor and Patagotitan to convey the disparity in size.

Titanosaur femurFigure 3 Photo Credit: J. Farfaglia Caption: Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio (M.E.F.) paleontologist Pablo Puerta lying down beside an eight-foot-long Titanosaur femur.  This photo is courtesy of M.E.F. via The Field Museum.

Titanosaur castFigure 4 Photo Credit: A. Otero Caption: Full, 122-foot-long cast of a Titanosaur skeleton in an airplane hangar in Argentina. This photo is courtesy of Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio (M.E.F.) via The Field Museum.

Fossil Excavation

Figure 5 Photo Credit: A. Otero Caption: This is a scientist excavating a Titanosaur fossil in the field in Argentina.  This photo is courtesy of Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio (M.E.F.) via The Field Museum.

Patagotitan fossil BTS at Field Museum

Figure 6 Photo Credit: © John Weinstein, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is Bill Simpson, Head of Geological Collections, looking over a real fossilized Titanosaur humerus at The Field Museum of Natural History. This real humerus fossil will be on display alongside the skeleton cast.

Patagotitan fossil BTS at Field Museum (1)

Figure 7 Photo Credit: © John Weinstein, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a real fossilized Titanosaur humerus at The Field Museum of Natural History that will be on display alongside the skeleton cast.

3. Sue with SUE

Figure 8 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: Fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson with SUE, the Tyrannosaurus rex fossilized skeleton she discovered in 1990.

Gastralia 2Figure 9 Photo Credit: © Zachary James Johnston, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: SUE’s gastralia on display in the exhibit Evolving Planet.

Gastralia & SUE 2Figure 10 Photo Credit: © Zachary James Johnston, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: Field Museum scientists Pete Makovicky (left), Associate Curator of Dinosaurs, and Bill Simpson (right), Head of Geological Collections, examine a cast of one of SUE’s gastralia.

Gastralia & SUE

Figure 11 Photo Credit: © Zachary James Johnston, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: Field Museum scientists Pete Makovicky (left), Associate Curator of Dinosaurs, and Bill Simpson, Head of Geological Collections, use a cast of one of SUE’s gastralia to show where they will be positioned on her skeleton.

In a press release, The Field Museum stated, “SUE the T. rex will be revamped with scientific updates and will move on up from Stanley Field Hall to the Museum’s most popular permanent exhibition, “The Griffin Hall of Evolving Planet.  The exhibition, which traces life from its origin to today, is home to a legion of dinosaurs ranging from tiny, birdlike Buitreraptor to 72-foot long Apatosaurus.  A whole new gallery will be added to the dinosaur section of Evolving Planet to showcase SUE and tell the story of her life on Earth.  The new exhibition space, which will span around 5,800 square feet, is expected to feature cutting-edge multimedia technology, digital interactives, and fossils discovered alongside SUE that illustrate the world she lived in – all in all, says Hansen, a state-of-the-art experience worthy of SUE.”

“At 42 feet long, she’s the world’s biggest T. rex, but in that giant hall, people sometimes remark that she’s smaller than they expected,” explained Ms. Hansen. “By putting her in her own gallery of our Evolving Planet exhibition, she’ll be put into the proper context of her fellow dinosaurs, and she’ll dominate the room.”

“In addition to getting a new space that showcases what an amazing specimen SUE is, we’ll be able to update the mount to reflect what we’ve learned about tyrannosaurs in the years since we first put her on display,” stated Dr. Peter (“Pete”) Makovicky, Associate Curator of Dinosaurs.  “It gives us a chance to tell a more story scientifically.”

In a press release, The Field Museum stated, “The most dramatic scientific change to SUE will be the addition of her gastralia – a set of bones that look like an additional set of ribs stretched across her belly.  Gastralia are rarely preserved in tyrannosaurs, and scientists weren’t quite sure how to position them when SUE’s skeleton was first mounted in 2000.  In the years since, research on SUE’s gastralia has illuminated their function and placement.”

Gastralia are also present in ancient crocodile relatives and likely originally developed as a means of defense – the network of bone protected the animals’ vulnerable bellies.  But for the dinosaurs, they probably had a different purpose: facilitating breathing.  Dinosaurs, like their modern bird relatives, had lungs comprised of an intricate network of airsacs.  And instead of having a muscular diaphragm to help push air in and out of their lungs like we do, they used the structural support provided by their gastralia to get the job done.

The addition of gastralia to SUE will change the way she looks.  “T. rex has a bulging belly – it wasn’t sleek and gazelle-like the way you might think from looking at SUE now without her gastralia,” Dr. Makovicky explicated.  “Well also update her body stance, so she’ll be walking rather than skulking, her arms will come down a little, and we’ll readjust her wishbone.”

SUE and SUE with gastraliaFigure 12 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of SUE as she looks now, SUE as she will look with gastralia, and a visitor (for size comparison).

Patagotitan SUE and visitor

 

Figure 13 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of the Patagotitan cast, SUE mounted with her gastralia, and a visitor standing in line (for size comparison).  Perhaps they’re in line at Starbucks.

Patagotitan SUE visitor 2

Figure 14 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of the Patagotitan cast, SUE mounted with her gastralia, and a visitor standing close together (for size comparison).

Titanosaur 1Figure 15 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of a visitor looking at the Patagotitan cast in Stanley Field Hall.  This is what it may look like to see someone viewing the Patagotitan cast from a vantage point inside a ground-floor gallery.

Titanosaur 3Figure 16 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of a visitor looking at the Patagotitan cast in Stanley Field Hall.  This next view is similar to the previous one but the vantage point this time inside Stanley Field Hall.

Titanosaur 2

Figure 17 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of a visitor looking at the Patagotitan cast in Stanley Field Hall.  Again, this is what it may look like to see someone viewing the Patagotitan cast from a vantage point inside a ground-floor gallery.  The Patagotitan mayorum the was the sole known species of genus Patagotitan of the clade Titanosauria.

Titanosaur and SUE 2

Figure 18 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of a visitor looking at the Patagotitan cast and SUE (mounted with her gastralia) in a way that will never happen in Stanley Field Hall.  The discoverers of the Patagotitan mayorum recently gave it that name.  Originally, the it was identified by its clade, as a Titanosaur.

Titanosaur and SUEFigure 19 Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a rendering of a visitor looking at the Patagotitan mayorum cast and SUE (mounted with her gastralia) in a way that will never happen in Stanley Field Hall.  The discoverers of the Patagotitan mayorum recently gave it that name.  Originally, the it was identified by its clade, as a Titanosaur.  Here, we see by exactly how many feet SUE will dwarf a man when her fossilized skeleton is re-mounted with her gastralia and the  Patagotitan mayorum cast will dwarf a man and would dwarf SUE if the three were lined up as if the man was a traffic warden.

 

In a press release, The Field Museum stated, “SUE’s renovation and Patagotitan’s arrival are possible thanks to the continued support of Ken Griffin, whose gift of $16.5 million to create ground-breaking dinosaur experiences to the next level.  Griffin, the founder and CEO of Citadel, set a new standard for the Field’s exhibitions in 2006 with his support for Evolving Planet, and is providing funding for the 2018 exhibition Antarctic Dinosaurs and accompanying dinosaur education programs.”  In a parallel press release, The Field Museum stated, “Ken Griffin is the founder and CEO of Citadel and a long-time supporter of The Field Museum.  He sponsored our permanent dinosaur and evolution exhibition, the Griffin Halls of Evolving Planet, which opened in 2006, and he’s supporting our renovation of Stanley Field Hall, as well as our Antarctic Dinosaurs exhibition, which will open in June 2018.  His generosity and commitment to making science available and accessible to the public is helping us continue to offer the best dinosaur experiences, and we’re extremely grateful to him!”

According to Forbes, Griffin is worth $8,500,000,000.  Griffin became a stock trader in 1987 while a student at Harvard University and added a satellite dish to the roof of his dorm to get real-time information.  Three years later, he founded Citadel, L.L.C., which today manages over $27,000,000,000 in assets.  He recently donated $12,000,000 to the Chicago Park District to divide the Lakefront Trail into separate walking and biking paths, as the Chicago Sun-Times related.

“The Field Museum has a huge impact on our ability to understand and appreciate dinosaurs.  I’m thrilled to partner with such an extraordinary institution to help put natural wonders like SUE and Patagotitan on display for the city of Chicago and its visitors,” stated Ken Griffin.

In response to a Field Museum tweet about Titanosaur statistics, movie star Bryce Dallas Howard (The Village, Jurassic World,), daughter of actor-director Ron Howard, tweeted, “The Titanosaur may be taking SUE’s current place in Stanley Field Hall, but the T. Rex remains top spot in my book!”[1]  Chicago Sun-Times columnist Mark Brown conceded that museums need to change to attract visitors but lamented that SUE, a real dinosaur fossil, will be moved upstairs to make way for a fiberglass model.

Her arrival in Chicago in May of 2000 breathed new life into The Field Museum, and in turn, made Chicago more special as the home of the world’s greatest dinosaur fossil.

Now we learn that SUE will be moved early next year from her position of honor on the museum’s main floor to make way for a new skeleton of an even larger dinosaur, Patagotitan mayorum, the largest known to man.

Except this new dinosaur, sometimes called a titanosaur, isn’t a fossil at all, but a fiberglass cast

A model, if you will.  A re-creation.  A composite pieced together from six different Patagotitan fossil specimens recovered in Argentina because they didn’t have even one as complete as Sue.

 

It may be especially difficult to young people who grew up with SUE in Stanley Field Hall to get used to the new look of the space.  Paleontologist William F. Simpsons, Head of Geological Collections, placed the changes in context. “I’ve worked at the Field since 1979, and I’ve seen Stanley Field Hall undergo a lot of changes in that time,” stated Simpson.  “When I started, we had a tyrannosaur in Stanley Field Hall, the Daspletosaurus that’s now in Evolving Planet.  In the mid-nineties, we replaced it with the brachiosaurus cast that’s now on the terrace outside the Museum, and in 2000 we welcomed SUE.  There’s always a lot of change in that space as we find new ways to share our science with the public.”  Concerning the fact that people may need some time to adjust to SUE’s new appearance, Simpson added, “That’s the way science works – we’re always making new discoveries.”

SFH 1Figure 20 Photo Credit: © Charles Carpenter, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a southward view of Stanley Field Hall with the staircases and statues Record and Dissemination of Knowledge by Henry Hering (1874-1949) visible at the far end, as it looked in 1920, the year The Field Museum of Natural History moved from the Palace of Fine Arts in Jackson Park into its new home in Burnham Park.  [The Palace of Fine Arts now houses the Museum of Science and Industry.]  The Field Museum of Natural History opened in its new home in 1921.

SFH 2Figure 21 Photo Credit: © Charles Carpenter, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is another southward view of Stanley Field Hall with the staircases and Hering’s statues visible at the far end, as it looked in 1929.  Here, we see three bronze sculptures of Lion Spearing in Africa by Carl Akeley, who was a sculptor as well as a taxidermist.

SFH 3Figure 22 Photo Credit: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a southward view of Stanley Field Hall, as it looked in 1945, with the staircases, Hering’s statues, and Akeley’s African Elephant Group visible at the far end.

SFH 4Figure 23 Photo Credit: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a southward view of Stanley Field Hall, as it looked in 1948, with the staircases and Hering’s statues visible in the deep background, a crowd in front of Akeley’s African Elephant Group in the center, and a penicillin exhibit in a glass in the foreground.

SFH 5Figure 24 Photo Credit: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a southward view of Stanley Field Hall, as it looked in 1968, with the staircases and Hering’s statues visible in the deep background, and a group of people gathered around a fountain in front of Akeley’s African Elephant Group in the center.  Note that there are two fast-moving people in the picture who appear blurry.  Those are not ghosts.

SFH 6Figure 25 Photo Credit: © James Balodimas, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a southward view of Stanley Field Hall, as seen in 1992, with a Gorgosaurus on display.  Later, it moved upstairs into the exhibit Life Over Time, which became Evolving Planet, where the dinosaur remains. Notice Akeley’s African Elephant Group in the background, as well as the staircases and Hering’s statues in the deep background.

SFH 7

Figure 26 Photo Credit: © John Weinstein, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: The Brachiosaurus cast on display in Stanley Field Hall in 1995, as viewed from the second floor balcony.  Notice the fountain in the center, Akeley’s African Elephant Group in the background, and the staircases and Hering’s statues so far in the background the statues are barely visible.

Sue in Stanley Field HallFigure 27 Photo Credit: © John Weinstein, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: SUE as she is currently mounted in Stanley Field Hall

SFHFigure 28 Photo Credit: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: SUE with Akeley’s African Elephant Group in Stanley Field Hall in The Field Museum of Natural History.

SFH 9Figure 29 Photo Credit: © John Weinstein, The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: SUE with Akeley’s African Elephant Group in Stanley Field Hall in The Field Museum of Natural History on President’s Day in 2010 (Monday, February 15, 2010).

Stanley Field Hall

Figure 30 Photo Caption: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: A northward view of Stanley Field Hall, with the Will Call desk in the foreground, Akeley’s African Elephant Group and SUE in the background, and Hering’s statue Science in the deep background.

Through SUE’s Twitter account (@SUEtheTrex), The Field Museum joked, “For years now, I’ve been pitching this to the Museum.  A room with a better defensible position against velociraptor attacks and reduced exposure to possible meteorite collisions.  Finally, the mammals in charge have come to their senses.”

SUE is the subject of at least half a dozen books and the documentary Dinosaur 13: The True Tale of one of the Greatest Discoveries in History (2014).  The 3D film Waking the T. rex 3D: The Story of SUE, which D3D Cinema and The Field Museum debuted at The Field Museum’s 3D Theater on Tuesday, January 1, 2013 and will play through Sunday, December 31, 2017. Ernst & Young, L.L.P. sponsors the 3D Theater.

ParasaulolophusFigure 31 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a Parasaulolophus fossilized skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History.

Dimetredon FrontFigure 32 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a front view of the fossilized Dimetredon skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet in The Field Museum of Natural History.

Pete & Nate in quarryFigure 33 Photo Credit: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: Paleontologists Peter (“Pete”) Makovicky, Ph.D., and Nathan (“Nate”) Smith, Ph.D., removing blocks of fossil-bearing rock containing Cryolophosaurus bones from Mount Kirkpatrick quarry during a 2010-2011 expedition in Antarctica.

Hanging load from helicopterFigure 34 Photo Credit: © The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: A helicopter is airlifting a fossil-bearing rock back to camp. The temporary exhibit Antarctic Dinosaurs will open at The Field Museum on June 15, 2015 and run through January 6, 2019.  Afterward, it will become a traveling exhibit.

The 7,500-square-foot temporary exhibit Antarctic Dinosaurs will open at The Field Museum on June 15, 2018 and run through January 6, 2019.  At that point, it will become a traveling exhibit.  The content specialists are Dr. Makovicky; Dr. Nathan D. Smith, Associate Curator at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; and a group of scientists from Augustana College, the University of Washington, the University of Alberta, and the Iziko South African Museum.

On September 16, 1893, the Colombian Museum of Chicago incorporated, and on October 26, 1893, Marshall Field I (1834-1906) announced he would donate $1,000,000 to the project, provided that $500,000 in cash be raised from other sources and that $2,000,000 in World’s Columbian Exposition stock (then thought to be worth ten cents on the dollar) be donated, but he later waived these conditions.   The $8,000,000 bequest Marshall Field I left what was then called the Field Columbian Museum in his will was to be divided evenly into two funds: one allotment of $4,000,000 for erecting a new building to house the institution, and a second allotment of $4,000,000 would provide an endowment.   Stanley Field, Marshall Field I’s nephew, was the eponym of Stanley Field Hall, which was originally called Central Hall.  He was the third president of The Field Museum of Natural History.  It was he oversaw the move in 1920 from the organization’s first home, the Palace of Fine Arts (which now houses the Museum of Science and Industry) in Jackson Park to its new purposes-built home in Burnham Park.  He held the post from 1908 to 1964 and also gave The Field Museum $2,000,000.

The Field Museum is part of the Museum Campus with the John G. Shedd Aquarium and Adler Planetarium at the northern end of Burnham Park.  The street address of The Field Museum is 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60605-2496.  The phone number is (312) 922-9410.

[1] The filmography of Bryce Dallas Howard also includes Spider-Man 3 (2007), Terminator Salvation (2009), The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010), Pete’s Dragon (2016), and Gold (2016).

“Free Days at the Museum of Science and Industry for Illinois Residents” by S.M. O’Connor

Starting on Tuesday, September 5, 2017, Illinois residents receive free Museum Entry (general admission) every weekday (Monday-Friday) the month of September at the Museum of Science and Industry (M.S.I.). This comes on the heels of two announcements about free days for Chicago Public School students.  Twelve Chicago cultural institutions announced they had free general admission for C.P.S. students this week through today (Saturday, September 2, 2017): the Adler Planetarium, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago History Museum, The DuSable Museum of African American History, The Field Museum, Lincoln Park Zoo, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Science and Industry, the National Museum of Mexican Art, The National Museum of Puerto Rican Art & Culture, the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, and the John G. Shedd Aquarium.  C.P.S. students need to furnish proof they are students by providing school identification cards or Spring 2017 report cards.  All of the institutions are providing free general admission for one accompanying adult and some are offering free general admission for whole families.  Earlier this week, the M.S.I. also announced that all Chicago Public Schools students (K-12) who attend the first day of class this school-year will receive family vouchers for three to visit the Museum of Science and Industry.  The vouchers are included in the orientation packets.

Schedule of Free Days at M.S.I. for Illinois Residents in September

First Week: September 5-8

Second Week: September 11-15

Third Week: September 18-22

Fourth Week: September 25-29

Illinois residents can experience over a dozen hands-on exhibits, including Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, Science Storms, YOU! The Experience, Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze, The New U-505 Experience, and Imagining the Museum.  In Science Storms, visitors can watch a twenty-foot-tall Tesla Coil shoot 1,500,000 volts of electricity to simulate lightning.  They can explore a thirteen-foot-tall digital heart and a human-sized hamster wheel in YOU! The Experience.  Visitors can discover mathematical patterns in the world as they navigate the labyrinth at the center of Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze.  They can learn about the danger the German submarine fleet posed to American freighters during World War II and the exciting story of how U.S. Navy Task Group 22.3 captured the U-505 as they descend into the submarine’s underground exhibit gallery and walk around her.  Another window into the past for visitors is the temporary exhibit Imagining the Museum, where they can see concept art for exhibits focused on everything from fire-fighting to time that date as far back as the 1930s.

One must be an Illinois resident to enjoy this benefit.  Robot Revolution, Brick by Brick, the U-505 Submarine on-board tour, Future Energy Chicago, the Coal Mine, the WOW! Tour, Giant Dome Theater film screenings, and other special exhibits and experiences are not included in Museum Entry and require the purchase of additional, timed-entry tickets.  This is an excellent opportunity for families and individuals who cannot normally afford to enter special exhibits and see Giant Dome film screenings

PhotographerFigure 1 Photo Caption: J.B. Spector Caption: This is a view of the south façade of the Central Pavilion of the Museum of Science and Industry and Columbia Basin in Jackson Park on the South Side of Chicago.

Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry
Colleen Moore Fairy Castle @ the Museum of Science and Industry

Figure 2 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Approximately 100 people built Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle for the silent film star and financier Colleen Moore (1899-1988) between 1928 and 1935.  She went on a national tour with it to raise money for children’s charities before Major Lenox Lohr (1891-1968), President of the Museum of Science and Industry, convinced her to bring it to the M.S.I.

NiN_MAZE_0076Figure 2 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze opened on Wednesday, October 8, 2014.  The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia is the first museum to host a traveling version of this math exhibit, A Mirror Maze: Numbers in Nature.  It opened on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 and runs through Monday, September 4, 2017.

(Multiple values)
Science Storms exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago

Figure 3 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: The most popular feature of the Science Storms physics exhibit is a forty-foot-tall swirling vortex, a tornado simulation.

U-505 Submarine @ the Museum of Science+Industry Chicago
U-505 Submarine @ the Museum of Science+Industry Chicago

Figure 4 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is the U-505 inside the subterranean 35,000-square-foot McCormick Tribune Foundation Exhibition Hall.  The New U-505 Experience opened on June 5, 2005.

You! the Experience exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago
You! the Experience biology exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago

Figure 5 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: YOU! The Experience opened on the North Balcony (overlooking Rosenwald Court) in the Museum of Science and Industry’s Central Pavilion in October of 2009.

FutureEnergy_SciMinors_216__2_Figure 6 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Students choose different power sources to fuel Chicago as they take on the role of power engineers in the “Future Power” game, part of the Future Energy Chicago exhibit at the M.S.I. The preview period for this exhibit began on Wednesday, September 18, 2013.

aviation_transportation_renderFigure 7 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is a rendering of the proposed Transportation Zone in the East Court of the Central Pavilion of the Museum of Science and Industry.  The rendering can be currently seen in the exhibit Imagining the Museum.  Note that, as built, the Burlington Zephyr is actually between the two wings of the underground garage and is accessible from the Entry Hall.  The Great Train Story sits where the Burlington Zephyr can be seen in this rendering.  Also, the Air Traffic Control Tower seen here was not built.

Robot Revolution Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago
CHARLI from the Robot Revolution exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago

Figure 8 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: The 1.3-meter-tall CHARLI, developed to move and be shaped like humans, can walk in all directions, turn, and kick.  The M.S.I. brought back its national touring exhibit Robot Revolution, which re-opened on Thursday, May 11, 2017.  It will run through Sunday, February 4, 2018.

Brick By Brick Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago
Brick By Brick exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago

Figure 9 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: LEGO® Certified Professional Adam Reed Tucker’s model of the Golden Gate Bridge in the exhibit  is 60’ long, took 215 hours to design, took 260 hours to build, and is comprised of 64,500 bricks.  Brick by Brick has been extended through Sunday, January, 7, 2018.

 

Starting on Tuesday, September 5, 2017, the Museum of Science and Industry will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Until Labor Day (Monday, September 4, 2017), the M.S.I. will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. [During peak periods, the M.S.I. is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.  On Sunday, September 24, 2017, the M.S.I. will be open from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.]  The Museum of Science and Industry is located in the northeast corner of Jackson Park in the neighborhood of Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago.  It stands on 57th Street at the intersection with Lake Shore Drive.  The address is 5700 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60637.  The phone number is (773) 684-1414.

 

“Museum of Science and Industry to Offer Free Family Pass to Every C.P.S. Student Who Attends 1st Day of Class” by S.M. O’Connor

The Museum of Science and Industry (M.S.I.) is celebrating the new schoolyear by offering a free family pass to every Chicago Public Schools (C.P.S.) student (K-12) who attends the first day of class.  Each pass is good for up to three adult or child Museum Entry (general admission) tickets between Monday, September 5, 2017 and Monday, June 18, 2018.  The passes will be included in the information packets all C.P.S. students receive on their first day of class.  They must be redeemed on-site and cannot be redeemed through the M.S.I.’s online ticketing system, call center, or kiosks.  The original pass must be presented at the time of purchase.  The pass only applies to Museum Entry, and additional tickets must be purchased for Brick by Brick, Robot Revolution, the U-505 on-board tour, Coal Mine, WOW! Tour, and films screened in the Giant Dome Theater.  Note that walking around the U-505 without boarding her, is covered by Museum Entry tickets.

NorthExterior_U-505Banners_0016.jpgFigure 1 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: The Museum of Science and Industry is in Jackson Park in the neighborhood of Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago.

In addition, today, Wednesday, August 30, 2017, C.P.S. students get free Museum Entry (general admission) for themselves and one additional adult.  A spokeswoman wrote, “With free Museum Entry, families can explore the physics of weather with a 40-foot-tall whirling vortex in Science Storms, get lost in the patterns that surround is in Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze, and discover the historic World War II story of the Museum’s largest artifact, the U-505 Submarine.”  This is the M.S.I.’s eleventh year of offering this benefit to C.P.S. families, with over 4,400,000 free passes given to C.P.S. students since the program launched.

NiN_MAZE_0076Figure 2 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze occupies the space on the Main Floor in the southwest corner of the Farrell Family Court (South Court) that formerly housed Petroleum Planet.  The exhibit opened on Wednesday, October 8, 2014.

 

(Multiple values)Figure 3 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: The most popular feature of the Science Storms physics exhibit is a forty-foot-tall swirling vortex, a tornado simulation.

U-505 Submarine @ the Museum of Science+Industry ChicagoFigure 4 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: This is the U-505 inside the subterranean 35,000-square-foot McCormick Tribune Foundation Exhibition Hall.   The New U-505 Experience opened on June 5, 2005.

 

Robot Revolution Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago
Robot Revolution Exhibit @ the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago

Figure 5 Photo Credit: J.B. Spector, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Baxter, an industrial robot, can play two people simultaneously in games of tic-tac-toe in the traveling exhibit Robot Revolution.

 

Currently, the Museum of Science and Industry is open from 9:30 a.m. to until 5:30 p.m., this being a peak period of the year.  [During slower periods of the year, the Museum of Science and Industry is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.]  It is located in the northeast corner of Jackson Park in the neighborhood of Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago.  The Museum of Science and Industry stands on 57th Street at the intersection with Lake Shore Drive.  Its address is 5700 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60637.

 

“Dinosaurs, Dragons Rampage at Field Museum, Brookfield Zoo” by S.M. O’Connor

 

 

In its Midwest debut, Jurassic World: The Exhibition opened at The Field Museum of Natural History on Friday, May 26, 2017 and runs through Sunday, January 17, 2018.  This exhibit, which features animatronic dinosaurs (and an animatronic synthetic monster) and interactive educational elements, appeals both to people who were already attracted to the Tyrannosaurus rex SUE in Stanley Field Hall and The Field Museum’s other dinosaurs in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet, as well as fans of the Jurassic Park franchise.  Dinos & Dragons at the Brookfield Zoo is a temporary exhibit that opened on Saturday, May 6, 2017 and will be open through Sunday, September 17, 2017.  This is also a timely exhibit, which includes animatronic dinosaurs and mythical creatures, live lizards, a puppet show, and informative signs, because of the global popularity of Game of Thrones, H.B.O.’s adaptation of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series of high fantasy novels.  [The climax of the first novel and first season were the hatching of three dragons from seemingly fossilized eggs for Daenerys (“Dany”) Stormborn (played by English actress Emilia Clark) of House Targaryen on the funeral pyre of her first husband.  In each season of the show and all but one of the novels, the dragons – living weapons of mass destruction, like a cross between real-world war elephants and atomic bombs – have grown in size and importance. Tonight’s episode, “The Dragon and the Wolf,” the seventh season finale, will be set in part in the Dragon Pit, a large structure erected by Dany’s ancestors in their capital city of King’s Landing to hold dragons.[1]]  The three exhibits compliment each other, with the result that parents are able to show children in some cases what the fossilized skeleton of a particular dinosaur species looked like in Stanley Field Hall and Evolving Planet and then showing the children what that dinosaur species might have looked like in the flesh with an animatronic counterpart in Jurassic World: the Exhibition and/or Dinos & Dragons.  For this reason, I recommend visiting The Field Museum one day and the Brookfield Zoo the next day, if time and money allow.

This traveling exhibit Jurassic World: The Exhibition ties in with the fourth Jurassic Park science fiction/horror/adventure film, Jurassic World (2016), which starred Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard.  Colin Trevorrow was the director.  Steven Spielberg was the executive producer. It was Spielberg, the director of the first and second films in the series – Jurassic Park (1993) and The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) – who brought the fourth film out of development hell with the suggestion that it should be about the theme park full of living dinosaurs John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) wanted to establish in the first film finally coming into being.[2]   The dinosaurs in the film were once again created through C.G.I. by Lucasfilm’s Industrial Light and Magic and animatronics by Legacy Effects, a company co-founded by four partners who had worked for Stan Winston (1946-2008) at the Stan Winston Studio, which had created the animatronic dinosaurs for Jurassic Park (1993).[3]

Jurassic World was the fourth film in the series as a whole and the first installment in a new trilogy.  Executive Producers Steven Spielberg and Colin Trevorrow are bringing the world a fifth film in the series, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) for Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment.  It is currently in production in London.  Stars Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard are re-uniting with B.D. Wong, who plays Dr. Henry Wu from the first and fourth films.  Jeff Goldblum, who played mathematician Ian Malcolm in the first and second films, is returning to the franchise.  They will be joined by character actors Tony Jones and James Cromwell.  Producers Frank Marshall and Pat Crowley are returning to the franchise, and they are being joined by Belén Atienza.  Trevorrow wrote the script with Derek Connolly.  Spanish film director J.A. Bayona (The Orphanage, The Impossible) is helming the project.  This project had the working title Jurassic World 2 when filming began in London.

Museum visitors travel to Isla Nublar (the fictional island off the coast of Costa Rica from Crichton’s first novel, the first film, and the fourth film) as V.I.P. guests to see a Brachiosaurus, Velociraptor, and a Tyrannosaurus rex.  Visitors who walk through Jurassic World: The Exhibition pass through a replica of the Jurassic World theme park gates from the film Jurassic World to gain close proximity to towering animatronic dinosaurs, some of which are over twenty-four feet tall.   Guests enter the family-friendly Gentle Giants Petting Zoo, the Hammond Creation Lab, and the Raptor Training Paddock.  The highlight is a preview of Jurassic World’s synthetic Indominus rex monster developed by combing DNA from multiple species of dinosaurs.  Please note that Jurassic World is housed in a climate-controlled 16,000-square-foot exhibition tent next to The Field Museum building.  [Even so, on hot days, the tent may be warmer than the exhibits inside the museum building.]  This tent on the front lawn, marks the first time The Field Museum has employed such a structure as an annex.

JTP-GatesFigure 1 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: The Gates of Jurassic World (the fictional theme park) as seen in Jurassic World (2016) the movie in Jurassic World: The Exhibition at The Field Museum of Natural History.

JTP-TRex

Figure 2 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: An animatronic Tyrannosaurs rex in Jurassic World: The Exhibition at The Field Museum of Natural History.

JTP-ParasaurolophusFigure 3 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: An animatronic Parasaurolophus in Jurassic World: The Exhibition at The Field Museum of Natural History.

JTP-IndominousFigure 4 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: An animatronic Indominous rex in Jurassic World: The Exhibition at The Field Museum of Natural History.

JW_FI_Raptor_Cage_01Figure 5 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: Raptor Paddock in Jurassic World: The Exhibition at The Field Museum of Natural History.

The traveling Jurassic World exhibit compliments The Field Museum’s dinosaur bone collections, the crown jewel of which is SUE, the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton yet recovered, on display in the Stanley Field Hall.  Most of The Field Museum’s dinosaurs are on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet.

Unveiled2Figure 6 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: SUE unveiled at The Field Museum of Natural History.

1. SUE in Stanley Field HallFigure 7 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: SUE in Stanley Field Hall at The Field Museum of Natural History.

Parasaulolophus2Figure 8 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a Parasaulolophus fossilized skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History.

HerrarasaurusFigure 9 Photo Credit: The Field Museum Caption of Natural History: This is a fossilized Herrarasaurus skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History

Herrarasaurus IllustrationFigure 10 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a Herrarasaurus illustration from the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History

Dimetredon SideFigure 11 Photo Credit: The Field Museum Caption: This is a side view of the fossilized Dimetrodon skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet in The Field Museum of Natural History. Technically, dimetrodons were not dinosaurs.  Scientists believe they lived in the Early Cambrian Period and died off 40,000,000 before the first dinosaurs walked the Earth.

DaspletosaurusFigure 12 Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: This is a fossilized Daspletosaurus skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History.

ApatosaurusFigure 13 Photo Credit: The Field Museum Caption: This is an Apatosaurus fossilized skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History.

PteranodonFigure 14 Photo Credit: The Field Museum Caption: This is an Pteranodon fossilized skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History.

TriceratopsFigure 15 Photo Credit: The Field Museum Caption: This is a Triceratops fossilized skeleton on display in the permanent exhibit Evolving Planet at The Field Museum of Natural History.

 

The Creature Technology Company designed the lifelike animatronic dinosaurs for Jurassic World: The Exhibition, which was produced by Universal Brand Development, Imagine Exhibitions, MagicSpace, and IES.  The world premiere of Jurassic World: The Exhibition was at the Melbourne Museum in Melbourne, Australia and the American debut was at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.   According to The Field Museum and the exhibit’s producers, it “shattered” attendance records at both museums.  The famous American paleontologist Jack Horner, who inspired the character Dr. Alan Grant – played by Sam Neill in the first and third films – and served as Paleontological Advisor on Jurassic World, helped develop the exhibit, which includes interactive educational elements about real science.

Jurassic World: The Exhibition is an immersive and educational experience like no other, and the response from fans has been tremendous, with the first two tour stops breaking attendance records,” stated Carol Nygren, Vice President, Worldwide Live Entertainment, Universal Brand Development.  “The Field Museum is world-renowned for its dinosaur collection and research, and we’re excited to bring The Exhibition to Chicago as part of our global tour.”

“From the beginning of this project, our mission has been to transport people to Jurassic World,” stated Tom Zaller, President and C.E.O. pf Imagine Exhibitions.  “I am proud of all that our team at Imagine Exhibitions has accomplished with our partners, and that we are fortunate enough to help bring the astonishing Jurassic World franchise to life.”

“One of our goals as a museum is to provide visitors with the best dinosaur experience in the world,” stated Field Museum President Richard Lariviere.  “Our fossil collections are one of the greatest things about The Field Museum, and the Jurassic World dinosaurs are an incredible way to spark our imaginations about them.  After experiencing an animatronic T. rex, you can come inside, witness SUE, and picture what an incredible animal she must have been in real life.”

The Field Museum is open these days from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  However, Jurassic World: The Exhibition is open until 9:00 p.m., with last admission at 8:00 p.m.

Tickets for Jurassic World: The Exhibition are $10 for children and $15 for adults during The Field Museum’s daytime entry, in addition to general museum admission tickets. [Basic Admission tickets are $22 for adults, $19 for students and senior citizens (ages sixty-five-and-older), and $15 for children (ages three-to-eleven).] Tickets for Jurassic World: The Exhibition alone during evening hours are $20 for children, $25 for adults, and $22 for senior citizens.  An All-Access Pass cost $36 for adults, $31 for students and senior citizens (ages sixty-five-and-older), and $25 for children (ages three-to-eleven). A Discovery Pass that includes a 3D movie and one ticketed exhibit other than Jurassic World: The Exhibition costs $30 for adults, $26 for students and senior citizens (ages sixty-five-and-older), and $21 for children (ages three-to-eleven).  One can purchase tickets online at https://www.fieldmuseum.org/at-the-field/exhibitions/jurassic-world-exhibition.

Jurassic World is a trademark of Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment, Inc.  Universal Studios licensed the name for the exhibit.  United Airlines is the Official Travel Partner of Jurassic World: The Exhibition (at least at The Field Museum).  Founded in 1912 by Carl Laemmle, Sr. (1867-1939) and a group of six partners through the merger of existent movie companies, Universal Studios, also known as Universal Pictures, is the oldest American movie studio, and the fourth-oldest in the world.  Today, it is part of the Universal Filmed Entertainment Group, a division of NBCUniversal, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the telecommunication conglomerate Comcast Corporation.  Universal Brand Entertainment, a business segment of Universal Filmed Entertainment, is involved in franchise brand management, consume products, video games and digital platforms, and live entertainment adapted from the company’s portfolio of intellectual properties created by Universal Studios, Illumination Entertainment, DreamWorks Animation, and the National Broadcasting Company (N.B.C.) and other NBCUniversal cable and television companies.  In a press release, Universal brand Development stated that it “globally drives expansion of the company’s intellectual properties, franchises, characters and stories through innovative physical and digital products, content, and consumer experiences.”

Imagine Exhibitions has thirty exhibitions on display in museums, science centers, aquariums, resorts, and other venues.  Founded in 2006 and based in Melbourne, Australia, the Creature Technology Company creates animatronic creatures for exhibitions, arena spectacles, stage shows, and other events.  The Creature Technology Company created the animatronic dinosaurs for the Walking with Dinosaurs – The Arena Spectacular,[4] which debuted in Australia in 2007 and toured the U.S.A. in 2007-2010, 2011; Europe in 2010, 2012; and Asia in 2010-2011.  Subsequently, Creature Technology Company developed How to Train Your Dragon – Live Spectacular for DreamWorks Animation, King Kong for the Global Creatures stage show, the 7.5-meter-tall animatronic Statue of Liberty for the annual Rockettes New York Spectacular at Radio City Music Hall, and the mascots for the XXII Olympic Winter Games Opening and Closing Ceremonies in Sochi.

Scientists from around the world comes to study The Field Museum of Natural History’s collections of over 30,000,000 artifacts and specimens.  The Field Museum has over 350,000 square feet of exhibit space.  Since 2000, The Field Museum has created fifteen touring exhibitions that have been seen by over 12,000,000 people.

The Field Museum is part of the Museum Campus with the John G. Shedd Aquarium and Adler Planetarium at the northern end of Burnham Park.  The street address of The Field Museum is 1400 South lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60605-2496.  The phone number is (312) 922-9410.

90561380-b246-43ef-90a6-ae88ef9a9c78Figure 16 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Dracorex hogwartsia at Roosevelt Foundation that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.  From the name, one might guess this was a pseudo-Latin name J.K. Rowling coined for a dragon, but in reality this was the name visitors to the Indianapolis Children’s Museum voted on for a real species of dinosaurs as a tribute to the Harry Potter books.

 

Dinos & Dragons, presented by Meijer, features seventeen animatronic dinosaurs and dragons, as a well as a real Komodo dragon and other reptiles.  This temporary summer exhibit has both indoor and outdoor components.  It is located in the southeastern quadrant of Brookfield Zoo, between BZ Red Hots to the east of Hamill Family Wild Encounters (formerly the Hamill Family Play Zoo) to the south.  The animatronic creatures include a Stegosaurus, an Apatosaurus, a Tyrannosaurus rex, and a Chinese dragon.  As zoogoers pass the animatronic creatures along a winding path, they also encounter educational signs about legends, myths, culture, literature, and paleontology.  Zoogoers can see real living reptiles in a tent along the path, one of which is a Komodo dragon.

This is the first time a Komodo dragon has been on display at the Brookfield Zoo.  It is not, however, the first time a live Komodo dragon has been displayed in Chicagoland.  The Fort Worth Zoo loaned a Komodo dragon named Faust to the Shedd Aquarium between 2006 and 2008 (during which time he grew five inches and gained fifty pounds) for the temporary exhibit Lizards and the Komodo King.

 

c0ad4f2d-c781-45fa-a2d5-8b12fc4fdc00Figure 17 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Utahraptor that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

b3168f1b-82f8-42e6-8a3c-1e996af794eeFigure 18 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: These are two animatronic Pteranodons that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

5873fcdd-c5f9-420a-b5dc-f8715d9683c5Figure 19 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Dilophosaurus that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

302cd8f8-2d86-4c0e-b84c-e383b5eabe73Figure 20 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Triceratops that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

87c1fcf9-3402-4429-9e2a-955b7d57a300Figure 21 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Pteranodon that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

9bdaafc1-b8b3-4fa6-991d-d7d78f7cb80cFigure 22 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Apatosaurus that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

8c2797d0-28b2-4dd9-901f-a99718dbd45bFigure 23 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Tyrannosaurus rex that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

c41c4a0e-1310-471d-90dd-79a8ec881717Figure 24 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic Tyrannosaurus rex that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

84e22ecd-97a1-4fd3-baf3-caa29e6ae6a6Figure 25 Photo Credit: Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is an animatronic wyvern that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.  A wyvern is a dragon-like creature from Irish, Scottish, and Welsh legend that has a total of four limbs – wings and hind legs like a bird or a bat – instead of a total of six limbs – wings, forelegs, and hind legs – like a dragon.

ba4e3152-3e64-4c48-95f4-1b17c6a056c9Figure 26 Photo Credit: Build 4 Impact, Inc. Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is a Roughneck Monitor that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

8a04b49b-2da3-4892-842a-8b3bea198c26Figure 27 Photo Credit: Build 4 Impact, Inc. Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is a Plumed Basilisk that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

743bec54-bb61-4752-9bd4-f8353661f852Figure 28 Photo Credit: Build 4 Impact, Inc. Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is a Frilled Dragon that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

6f84c9cd-eaaa-45a4-8cd7-c57e093b6f11Figure 29 Photo Credit: Build 4 Impact, Inc. Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is a Crocodile Monitor that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

04f6ab68-6665-4728-9a90-1da087e9189eFigure 30 Photo Credit: Build 4 Impact, Inc. Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society Caption: These are Iguanas that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

c33ccd2f-626a-4185-b397-731ea6f1942bFigure 31 Photo Credit: Haley Greathouse Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society Caption: This is a Komodo dragon that can be seen in the Dinos & Dragons exhibit at Brookfield Zoo.

“We’re thrilled to offer this interactive exhibit to our guests,” stated Andre Copeland, Interpretive Program Manager for the Chicago Zoological Society.  “People young and old can experience the awe and wonder of seeing these extraordinarily lifelike dinosaurs and dragons – and hopefully learn a few things about these amazing creatures.”

Indoor attractions are spread across three dragooned-themed areas: Medieval Realm, Asian Realm, and Paleontology Realm.  In the Medieval Realm, zoogoers learn about dragons from European myths, folklore, and literature.  This area features a replica castle and the Hungarian Horntail dragon described in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the fourth Harry Potter book and as seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005), the fourth film in the series.  In the Asian Realm, zoogoers learn about the importance of dragons in Far East Asia.  This area includes a full-sized Chinese dragon costume.  In the Paleontology Realm, pin-sized paleontologists can don goggles and use brushes to cleanup replica fossils.

Real life “dragons” (live reptiles) are integrated within each realm in themed habits.  Live reptiles on display in the temporary exhibit include a Bearded Dragon, Frilled Dragon, Plumed Basilisk, Black-throated Monitor, Iguana, Roughneck Monitor, Crocodile Monitor, Komodo dragon, Uromastyx Lizard, European Legless Lizard, and Nile Monitor.

Interactive activities children in which children can participate include loading and reloading a catapult, staging a puppet show with a dragon backdrop, and digging up realistic-looking dinosaur fossils. Children can get temporary tattoos.  Zilla sponsored the photo peek board.  JULIE, Inc. and 811 sponsored the Dino Dig boxes.  LEGOLAND® Discovery Center Chicago is another exhibit partner as it provided the six-foot-tall models of a knight and dragon.

Outdoor attractions include seventeen animatronic dinosaurs and mythological creatures displayed amongst full-grown trees along a winding path.  As a guest passes each animatronic creature, a sensor signals the creature’s head, eyes, arms, and tail to move.  Another animatronic dinosaur is on display north of Roosevelt Fountain.  The animatronic creatures include an Ankylosaur, a Gryphon, a Stegosaurus, an Apatosaurus, a Megalosaurus, a Triceratops, a Chinese Dragon, a Pachycephalosaurus, a Tyrannosaurus rex, a Dilophosaurus, two Pteranodons, a Utahraptor, a Dracorex hogwartsia (at Roosevelt Fountain), a Quetzalcoatlus, and a Wyvern.[5]  Signs with colorful graphics introduce each animatronic creature.  The dinosaurs cover a range of time from the Stegosaurus that roamed North America during the Late Jurassic Period (150,000,000 years ago) to the Pteranodon that flew during the Late Cretaceous Period (85,000,000 to 75,000,000 years ago). Zoogoers can test their knowledge of dinosaurs and mythological monsters in parodies of games shows: DINOPARDY, Are You Smarter Than A Paleontologist?, and Dino Feud.  At one point along the trail, visitors see the Paleontologist Excavation Site, a facsimile of a dig site where paleontologists recover dinosaur fossils.  Near the exhibit’s exit, visitors find the Dinosaur Dissection Lab.  Staff members there engage children in dissecting dinosaur body part facsimiles comprised of non-latex materials.  The Dinosaur Dissection Lab features a light box with x-rays, beakers, books, and a microscope.

The Stage-o-saurus Theater, located just west of Tropic World, is a free, live theatrical show that features an animatronic raptor.  Audience participation is a key element of the show.

The Chicago Zoological Society operates the Brookfield Zoo, which the Forest Preserve District of Cook County owns.  Brookfield Zoo opened on Monday, June 30, 1934 after seven years of construction.  Over 2,000,000 people visit Brookfield Zoo on an annual basis.  The Chicago Zoological Society employees almost 400 full-time employees, a dozen permanent part-time employees, more than 500 seasonal employees.  The Chicago Zoological Society supplements its workforce with almost 900 volunteers.  It has an operating budget of $65,000,000.  The Cook County Forest Preserve District contributes 22.4% of the Brookfield Zoo’s operating budget.  The Chicago Zoological Society obtains the rest from admission tickets, parking fees, in-park sales, membership fees, grants, and donations.  Brookfield Zoo has two year-round restaurants, three seasonal restaurants, seven seasonal concessional stands, five gift shops, and three seasonal souvenir stands.

Brookfield Zoo Members get half off tickets.  Tickets are $5 for adults ($2.50 for Members), $3 for children ages three-to-eleven ($1.50 for Members), and $3 for senior citizens sixty-five or older ($1.50 for Members).  General admission tickets to the Brookfield Zoo are $19.85 for adults, $14.50 for children (three-to-eleven) and senior citizens (sixty-five years of age or older).  Until Labor Day, the Brookfield Zoo will remain on Summer Hours (9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.).  Afterward, it will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  The address of the North Gate Entrance is 8400 31st Street (at 1st Avenue and 31st Street), Brookfield, Illinois 60513, while the address of the Main South Gate is 3300 Golf Road, Brookfield, Illinois 60513.

 

[1] Dragons are a staple of high fantasy novels and movies, inspired by myths, legends, folktales, and fairytales, such as the epic Old English poem Beowulf, which ends with Beowulf, King of the Geats (in Sweden), killing a dragon years after he killed Grendel and that monster’s mother in Denmark.  An appendix to the hagiography of Saint George, a 7th Century martyr, traced now to an 11th Century Georgian text, stated that he slew a dragon, and Crusaders brought this tale back to Europe.  Martin has been open about being a fan of J.R.R. Tolkien (unlike J.K. Rowling who has identified Tolkien’s friend C.S. Lewis as an influence, but stated if she read Tolkien and Le Guin in her youth she had no memory of it) and dragons played a prominent role in J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium, particularly Smaug the Golden in The Hobbit and Glaurung (“The Deceiver”), one of the chief servants of Morgoth (Satan) in The Silmarillion.  Ursula K. Le Guin has depicted both good and evil dragons in her Earthsea Cycle of novels and short stories.  Anne McCaffrey and her son Todd have depicted synthetic dragons in their science fiction Dragonriders of Pern series of novels and short stories.  J.K. Rowling dramatically revealed dragons in the fourth and seventh Harry Potter novels, and the fourth and eighth Harry Potter films followed suit.  In Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance Cycle of high fantasy novels, Eragon is the first new Dragon Rider since Galbatorix killed his brethren and made himself king.

[2] The first film in the series was an adaptation of the bestselling novel Jurassic Park by novelist, screenwriter, and director Michael Crichton (1942-2008), published in 1990.  The second film in the series was an adaption of his sequel novel, The Lost World, published in 1995.  The third film in the series, Jurassic Park III (2001), was the first film in the series not to be based on a Crichton novel.  Crichton, in turn, used a science fiction premise – that dinosaur could be harvested from mosquitos trapped in amber for millions of years to create new dinosaurs in laboratories – to update earlier science fiction/adventure stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1938) and Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).  Doyle’s The Lost World, published in 1912, depicted dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals as still being alive on a remote South American plateau.  [He is, of course, better known as the creator of Sherlock Holmes.]  Burroughs, better known as the creator of Tarzan, introduced the isolated island of Caprona, where dinosaurs still roamed, in The Land that Time Forgot, published as a three-part series of short stories in Blue Book Magazine in 1918 and as a book by A.C. McClurg in 1924.

[3] Winston also made the animatronic lions for Ghost and the Darkness (1996).  The real-life Lions of Tsavo can be seen at The Field Museum.

GN87713_7c

Photo Credit: The Field Museum of Natural History Caption: The Tsavo Lions are on display at The Field Museum of Natural History.  Note that they are smaller now than in life because Colonel Patterson turned their skins into rungs before He sold them to The Field Museum, where a taxidermist mounted them to make them three-dimensional again.

[4] This was an adaptation of Walking with Dinosaurs (1999), a six-part documentary series produced for the B.B.C., which appeared in the U.S.A. in 2000 on the Discovery Channel with narration by Avery Brooks in place of Kenneth Branagh.

[5] A wyvern is a dragon-like creature from Irish, Scottish, English, and Welsh legend that has a total of four limbs – wings and hind legs like a bird or a bat – instead of a total of six limbs – wings, forelegs, and hind legs – like a dragon.  The Chicago Zoological Society stated, “Wyverns are often confused with dragons as they are a lesser known mythical creature.  In English, Irish, Welsh, and Scottish culture, the distinction between wyverns – having two legs – and dragons – having four – has been made since the sixteen century.  However, in modern pop culture, two-legged dragons are entirely acceptable.”  This is the Chicago Zoological Society’s way of addressing the fact several recent fantasies that meant to depict dragon instead depicted wyverns and called them dragons.  This is true of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire books and H.B.O.’s Game of Thrones adaptation of it, as well as Peter Jackson’s three-part adaptation of Tolkien’s The Hobbit.  Martin either did not know or did not care there was such a thing as a wyvern in mythology when he decided his dragons would have four limbs because that was more “realistic” given that birds and bats have four limbs.

“The Adler Planetarium’s Mammoth Eclipse-Watching Block Party” by S.M. O’Connor

The Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum is hosting or helping organize an eclipse-viewing party for tens of thousands of people on-site and at other locations in three states tomorrow, Monday, August 21, 2017: Chicago’s Eclipse Fest.  People in the seventy-one-mile-wide path of totality from Oregon to South Carolina will be able to view the total solar eclipse, while people in other parts of the Continental United States will be able to see a partial solar eclipse (if they have clear skies overhead).   This will only be visible in the U.S.A, so it is being called the Great American Eclipse of 2017.  In Chicagoland, we will be able to see the solar eclipse in 87% totality, meaning a sliver of the solar disc will be visible behind the Moon, at 11:54 a.m.  This ring of the solar disc that will be visible from behind the Moon is called an annulus.

This will be the first total solar eclipse over the U.S.A. since 1979.  A total solar eclipse was visible in a single American state, Hawaii, in 1991.  The solar eclipse in 90% of totality tomorrow will be the closest Chicagoland has been to a total solar eclipse in ninety-two years, since 1925.  The last time there was a total solar eclipse over Chicago was in 1806, at a time when only a handful of people lived here.  The next partial solar eclipse visible in the U.S.A. will occur in 2021, the next total solar eclipse will be visible in the U.S.A. in 2024, and the next total solar eclipse visible in Chicago will be in 2099.  A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, casting a shadow over part of the Earth’s surface.  A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon blocks out entirely the view of the Sun from a portion of the Earth.  This is as opposed to a partial solar eclipse that blocks out part of the Sun.

To avoid damaging one’s eyes, it is vital that one not look directly at the Sun when any part of it is visible without a solar filter.  It is important to only purchase or accept solar filters from reputable sources.   Regular sunglasses do not provide sufficient protection.  Use a pair of CE-and-ISO-certified solar viewing glasses.  Alternatively, one can use #14 welder’s glass, but only if it is shade number 14.  It is only safe to view a total solar eclipse with the naked eye if (a) one is in the path of totality and (b) one waits to gaze upon the Moon while it is completely obstructing one’s view of the Sun.  One must then immediately re-don protective eyewear when the Sun begins to re-emerge from behind the Moon.

If one is unable to obtain the Adler Planetarium-branded glasses or any other solar viewing glasses, one can still view the eclipse indirectly with a pinhole projector (and of course it is perfectly safe to watch video or photographs of the eclipse).  To create a pinhole projector, poke a hole in either an index card or a paper plate and take a second index card along as a screen.  Stand with the Sun to one’s back.  [Remember, it is vitally important not to view the Sun through the pinhole.]  With one hand, hold up the index card or paper plate with the pinhole points in the direction of the Sun.   With the other hand, hold the screen in position to catch the sunlight pouring in through the pinhole.  Position the screen so one can view the Sun.

One can learn more about how to safely view the solar eclipse from the Adler Planetarium online at www.adlerplanetarium.org/equippedtoeclipse.  The American Astronomical Society has also created a Web site that addresses the subject, www.eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety, which is endorsed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (N.A.S.A.), the National Academy™ of Ophthalmology, the American Academy of Optometry, the American Optometric Association, and the National Science Foundation.

adlerexterior

Figure 1 Photo Credit: Adler Planetarium Caption: Ernest A. Grunsfeld, Jr. won an American Institute of Architects Gold Medal for his design of the original building. Dirk Lohan, grandson of Mies van der Rohe, designed the C-shaped Sky Pavilion.

Guests at the Adler Planetarium will receive free solar-viewing glasses, talk with Adler Planetarium experts, participate in eclipse-related activities, and gather with a crowd anticipated to be 10,000 thousands of astronomy enthusiasts.  There will also be food trucks.   The first 30,000 Eclipse Fest visitors will receive free solar-viewing glasses.  These will be distributed one pair of solar-viewing glasses per person while supplies last.  Distribution of the glasses will begin at 9:30 a.m.  Outdoor activities are free.  Inside the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum, Eclipse Fest visitors will gain free admission to exhibits including the temporary exhibit Chasing Eclipses.

Adler-skyline-aerial-267x2111

Figure 2 Photo Credit: Adler Planetarium Caption: The Adler Planetarium is located at the northeastern tip of Northerly Island in Burnham Park.  The Field Museum, Shedd Aquarium, and Adler Planetarium comprise the Museum Campus.

The Adler Planetarium is located on Northerly Island, which is the only one of the manmade islands called for in Daniel Hudson Burnham, Senior’s Plan of Chicago to have actually been built.  It is one of the three institutions that form the Museum Campus in Burnham Park, the other two being The Field Museum of Natural History and the John G. Shedd Aquarium.

The parking lot adjacent to the Adler Planetarium will be in use for eclipse-related activities and will consequently be unavailable for parking.  Visitors who plan on driving should use the other parking lots on the Museum Campus and at Soldier Field.  A shuttle will run between Soldier Field and Chicago’s Eclipse Fest between 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.  The shuttle will pick passengers up on the north side of Soldier Field near the Chicago Transit Authority (C.T.A.) bus stop and drop them off at the Adler Planetarium.

Strongly recommending that visitors take public transportation, the Adler Planetarium has explained on its Web site that one can take the Red Line, Orange Line, or Green Line C.T.A. trains to the Roosevelt Stop, and then take walk over to the C.T.A. bus stop at the intersection of State Street and Roosevelt Road and board either a #146 bus or #130 bus.

Alternatively, one can rent a Divvy bicycle from any of the over 580 locations across Chicagoland.  Bike riders can save $2 off of a Divvy 24-Hour Pass with code ADLERIDE.  This will give one access to thousands of bicycles for a twenty-four-long period.

Adler Planetarium partners are hosting booths.  These will include the American Writers Museum, Bike and Roll, Broadway in Chicago, the Chicago Park District, Chicago Sky, Divvy, The Field Museum, Georama, Honest tea, ISEA Solar Ambassadors, KIND Bars, Lincoln Park Zoo, the Museum of Science and Industry, Navy Pier, chalk artist Shawn Hayes, the Shedd Aquarium, Whole Foods, and the United States Postal Service.

On the Solar Eclipse Main Stage, one can see live coverage of the solar eclipse from Chicago and Carbondale.  There will be “Mad Science” demonstrations live on the Main Stage, eclipse trivia, and “Man on the Street” interviews.  One of the activities will be “Ask and Astronomer.”

Other outdoor activities will include human chalk dials, an opportunity to create sundials, solar car races, solar oven demonstrations, and an opportunity to build one’s own pinhole projector.  For the family, there will be light-and-shadow activities, telescope viewing, “Selfies From Space,” and carnival fun.  This will include giant Jenga®, bean bag tosses, a “gladiator” obstacle course, and a giant bounce house.

Indoor activities include a special twelve-minute-long “Eclipse Watch” show for $2 and the standard thirty-minute-long Adler sky show for $5, the solar eclipse “talk-back experience,” the Adler Collections Corner.  There will also be a cooling station.

There will be a satellite eclipse-viewing party at Daley Plaza in front of the Richard J. Daley Center.  Starting at 11:30 a.m., Adler Planetarium staff members will be distributing solar viewing glasses while supplies last and presenting telescope-viewing opportunities.

To promote Chicago’s Eclipse Fest, the Adler Planetarium installed giant eclipse-viewing glasses at points throughout the city.  The Blue Glasses was at the John Hancock Center from July 7th to July 21st; Maggie Daley Park from July 21st to August 4th; Grant Park from August 4th to August 18th; and at Adler Planetarium since August 19th, and it will remain through the 21st.  The Pink Glasses have been on display at Daley Plaza since July 10th and it will remain there through the 21st.  The Orange Glasses was at Oak Street Beach from July 14th to July 28th; the Chinatown Branch of the Chicago Public Library from July 28th to August 11th; and the Lagunitas Brewing Company since August 12th, and it will remain there through the 21st.  The Adler Planetarium is holding the #EquippedtoEclipse Instagram contest.  To enter, take a photograph with all three of the Adler Planetarium’s Traveling Eclipse Glasses.  Then upload the photos to Instagram using the hashtag #EquippedToEclipse.  The contest began at 12:00 a.m. on July 10, 2017 and will end at 11:59 p.m. Chicago Daylight Saving Time on August 21, 2017.  Read the official rules online here.

These organizations will also be distributing Adler Planetarium-branded solar viewing glasses while supplies last: the Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe, Illinois; the Chicago Park District; the Chicago Public Library; The Morton Arboretum; Naper Settlement in Naperville, Illinois; Sea Dog Cruises; and the Wonder Works, A Children’s Museum in Oak Park, Illinois.  Some of these venues will be hosting their own eclipse-viewing parties.  Check their Web sites for details.  The Chicago Botanic Garden will be hosting a Solar Eclipse Viewing event.  The Chicago Public Library will be holding eclipse activities at twenty-four libraries.  These will include five Great Solar Eclipse Observation Events at the Wrightwood-Ashburn Branch Library, the Richard M. Daley Branch Library, the Chinatown Branch Library, the Conrad Sulzer Regional Library, and the North Austin Branch Library.  The Morton Arboretum is hosting a Total Solar Eclipse 2017 Drop-in Activity in the Sycamore Room.  Naper Settlement is hosting a free Solar Eclipse Viewing Picnic.  Admission is on a first-come, first-served basis.  Wonder Works is hosting an eclipse-viewing party covered by general admission.

The Adler Planetarium, N.A.S.A. EDGE, The N.A.S.A. 2017 Eclipse Team, and the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium are partnering with Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois to provide eclipse programming at Saluki Stadium, the S.I.U. football stadium.  There will be Adler Planetarium astronomers and educators to organize Eclipse Day activities, and answer questions, as well as view the eclipse.

Downstate viewers there will see the eclipse in its totality, meaning the Moon will completely block their view of the Sun.  The point of greatest duration for the total solar eclipse will be a few miles south of Carbondale.  People who want to experience the total eclipse in its greatest duration may join the Astronomical Association of Southern Illinois at Giant City State Park.  This region of Southern Illinois will also be in the pathway of the 2024 solar eclipse.  Hence, this region will make for a unique vantage point to observe both eclipses.  The pathways of the two eclipses intersect around Cedar Lake, south of the S.I.U. main campus at Carbondale.  The second eclipse will occur on April 8, 2024.  S.I.U. has established a Web site to disseminate information about the two eclipses.  It is eclipse™ 2017-2024 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS Eclipse Crossroads of America: www.eclipse.siu.edu.

Tomorrow, at the main S.I.U. campus in Carbondale, the eclipse will begin at 11:52 a.m. and end at 2:47 p.m.  It will reach totality at 1:21 p.m.   The total eclipse will last for two minutes and thirty-eight seconds.  S.I.U. estimates that 60,000 people from the Cabondale area and put of state will gather in and around Saluki Stadium to watch the eclipse.  Eclipse glasses will be provided and eclipse video will be on the scoreboard.  At S.I.U., this is Eclipse Day and classes are cancelled to allow students to watch the eclipse.  Information were available at www.eclipse.siu.edu/tickets, but Saluki Stadium Eclipse Day tickets are sold out.  One can learn about festivities at www.eclipse.siu.edu/festivities.  These include the Eclipse Comic-Con in the SIU Student Center (August 19th and 20th); the Crossroads Astronomy, Science and Technology Expo in the S.I.U. Arena (August 20th and 21st); and the Crossroads Art and Craft Fair (August 20th and 21st).  One can purchase associated merchandise online at www.eclipse.siu.edu/oddicial-siu-eclipse-merchandise. Permits are required to park on the Carbondale campus tomorrow.  Parking on paved parking spaces has sold out.  However, a limited number of grass parking spaces remain available to the general public without Saluki Stadium Eclipse tickets.  Planetary Radio’s Mat Kaplan will be Master of Ceremonies.

N.A.S.A. TV will be broadcasting and streaming footage captured by twelve ground-based video feeds, aircraft, spacecraft, high-altitude balloons, and the International Space Station.  Further, N.A.S.A. TV will be streaming via Facebook Live, YouTube, Periscope, and Twitch.  N.A.S.A. Edge will be streaming a four-hour-long “megacast” from outside Saluki Stadium in cooperation with the N.A.S.A. Heliophysics Education Consortium, S.I.U., and Lunt Solar Systems.  The megacast will begin at 10:45 a.m. Central Daylight Saving Time.  N.A.S.A. Edge will live stream over Facebook Live and other platforms.  In San Francisco, the Exploratorium is partnering with N.A.S.A. to stream videos on the museum’s Android and iOS apps.  The Weather Channel has a slate of Total Solar Eclipse programming.  Molly Rubin of Quartz has a comprehensive list of television networks and online platforms that enable people to safely view the eclipse in parts of the U.S.A. outside the path of totality and in foreign countries.  W.G.B.H., the P.B.S. station in Boston that produces so much content for P.B.S., has created a 2017 Solar Eclipse Teacher’s Toolkit.

The Adler Planetarium Far Horizons team will be in Perryville, Missouri to launch two high-altitude balloons into the stratosphere.  They will be able to capture 360o video of the total solar eclipse.  Astronomers and other experts will be on hand in Perryville to answer questions.

The name of the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum exhibit Chasing Eclipses is drawn from Rebecca R. Joslin’s book Chasing Eclipses: The Total Solar Eclipses of 1905, 1914, 1925, published in 1929.  The exhibit is sponsored by BMO Harris Bank and ITW.

The Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum was founded by Sears, Roebuck & Company executive Max Adler (1866-1952) and famed Northwestern University astronomer Major Philip Fox, Ph.D.  The Adler Planetarium opened on May, 12, 1930 and the institution celebrated its 85th anniversary in 2015.  Ernest A. Grunsfeld, Jr. won an American Institute of Architects Gold Medal for his design of the original building.   Chicago’s architectural firm of Lohan Associates designed the 60,000-square-foot Sky Pavilion (1998) and oversaw renovation of the original building (1999).  The architect of record was Dirk Lohan, grandson and student of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969).

The Women’s Board of the Adler Planetarium will host its biggest annual fundraiser on Saturday, September 9, 2017.  The 2017 Celestial Ball is being called Solar Flare.  A black-tie gala, the annual Celestial Ball raises around $1,700,000 to pay for educational programming.  Women’s Board President Linda Gerstman and 2017 Celestial Ball Co-Chairs Erika Lautman Bartelstein and Elisa Primavera-Bailey will host around 700 guests, including Chicago businessmen and businesswomen, civic leaders, and philanthropists. At the gala, Bob Livingston, President and C.E.O. of Dover, will accept the 2017 Corporate Partner Award on behalf of his company.

The Adler Planetarium has Summer Hours (9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.) from Saturday June 10, 2017 to Monday, August 21, 2017.  The address is 1300 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60605.  The phone number is (312) 922-7827.

“Amazon Adventure at M.S.I.’s Giant Dome Theater” by S.M. O’Connor               

 

 

As part of the celebration around the reopening of the Giant Dome Theater, the Museum of Science and Industry debuted Amazon Adventure (2017), a new film about the eleven-year-long journey of the English naturalist Henry Walter Bates (1825-1895) up the Amazon River in the 19th Century.  Amazon Adventure debuted on Memorial Day (May 29, 2017) inside the Museum of Science and Industry’s five-story wrap-around Giant Dome Theater (formerly the Omnimax® Theater).  In 2016, over 300,000 people visited the Museum of Science and Industry’s Omnimax® Theater, which opened in the Henry Crown Space Center in 1986.[1]  In May, the Museum of Science and Industry unveiled a state-of-the-art projection system in the Omnimax® Theater, which it renamed the Giant Dome Theater to emphasize the change in projection technology.  The Museum of Science and Industry is the first institution in Chicago and the second in the world to install the new system from D3D/Christie Laser Dome, a company based in north suburban Evanston, Illinois.  It uses three different laser projectors to create a composite image.  The Dover Foundation supports the Giant Dome Theater.

“We are excited to debut this technology in Chicago and believe that D3d and Christie’s laser-illuminated solution will continue to create the sense of awe that MSI guests have come to expect,” said Gil Perez, Director of Film and Guest Operations at the Museum of Science and Industry.  “As a world-class institution, we have set the bar extremely high, and we are confident that guests will feel even more immersed in the rich science-oriented topics presented in the movies we select.”

Bates spent the years between 1848 and 1859 traveling in the Brazilian Empire.  With his friend Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), he collected animal specimens from the Amazon Drainage Basin for British museums.  Bates was interested in animal mimicry, a phenomena in which one animal species gains an advantage by a superficial resemblance to another species.  He discovered myriad examples of a harmless butterfly species that had evolved to resemble a noxious butterfly species with the result that predators avoided the consumption of both species.  Wallace spent four years in the field and lost much of his collection in a fire when his ship burst into flames and sank on his return trip to the U.K. in 1852, but he managed to rescue his field notes.  Bates, meanwhile, continued their work in Brazil.  He sent specimens of 14,712 animal species (mostly insects) back to England, about 8,000 of which were hitherto unknown to science.  Many of these specimens ended up in the natural history departments of the British Museum that evolved into a separate institution, the Natural History Museum.  Bates hoped to help prove a theory of evolution. One of the authors whose works inspired Bates and Wallace to make their expedition was Charles Darwin (1809-1882), but Darwin had not yet published his theory of evolution by natural selection.  [Darwin had developed his theory between 1837 and 1839, but would not publish On the Origin of Species until 1859.]  Wallace developed his own theory of evolution before Darwin began to publish works on his theory of evolution.  It was Wallace’s belief that every new animal species to emerge diverges from a parent species and initially they share space and time but the new species outlives the parent species. From 1854 to 1862, Wallace worked in the field in the Malay Archipelago.  In 1858, Darwin published two of his own articles and one that Wallace had written and forwarded to him as a single work under both their names as “On the Tendency of Species to Form Varieties: and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection” in the Proceedings of the Linnean Society.  Upon his return to England, Bates wrote the book The Naturalist on the River Amazons: A record of the Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian Life, and Aspects of Nature Under the Equator, during Eleven Years of Travel, published in two volumes in 1863.  The next year, Bates received the appointment as Assistant Secretary of the Royal Geography Society.  Wallace wrote articles for the ninth edition of Encyclopæædia Britannica and twenty-one books, including Geographical Distribution of Animals, published in 1877, and Island Life, published in 1880.

Amazon Adventure will be screened through the spring of 2018.  Titans of the Ice Age, narrated by Christopher Plummer, will be screened through Sunday, September 10, 2017.  Tiny Giants, narrated by Stephen Fry, will be screened through Sunday, September 10, 2017.

In a press release, the Museum of Science and Industry stated, “Guests will follow Bates’ 11-year journey during the 1800s into the Amazon rainforest, which culminates with an incredible scientific discovery about the development of life on Earth… Amazon Adventure… is the first new film to be presented using the Theater’s newly installed laser projection system… The film follows the inspirational true story of Bates’ historic findings on animal mimicry, the astonishing phenomenon where one animal adopts the look of another in order to survive, which provided proof to Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection. Filmed on location in the lush Amazon region, Amazon Adventure immerses guests into a wild world of breathtaking beauty and captivating animal behavior.”

Painstakingly researched for three years, Amazon Adventure enlisted the expertise of more than 100 scientists and historical advisors. The team’s commitment to authenticity not only resulted in this rigorous re-creation, even using actual instruments and tools from the 1850s, but the writing team also incorporated many of Bates’ own words, as he was a gifted storyteller. The film was granted unprecedented access by the Natural History Museum of London to film Bates’ own scientific field notebooks and botanical drawings, and to film the butterflies he personally collected over 160 years ago.

“Walking in the footsteps of Henry Walter Bates, audiences get to follow the clues and see one of the most important discoveries about life unfold before them scene by scene,” said Executive Producer Sean B. Carroll. “Through Bates’ eyes, we see some of the first and best evidence of how and why species evolve. We hope this film, in tracing his adventures in the Amazon, shows where curiosity and perseverance can lead and inspires younger and older viewers alike.”

English director Mike Slee, best known for the television mockumentary The Great Martian War 1913-1917 (2013), directed Amazon Adventure, which stars Calum Finlay as Bates, Ed Birch as Wallace, Robert Dawes as Darwin, William Postlethwaite, Begê Muniz, and Louis Partridge as young Bates.  Canadian film editor, producer, and screenwriter Antoinette (“Toni”) Myers narrated the film.

Photo_1-_Henry_Bates_in_WorkshopFigure 1 Photo Credit: SK Films Caption: English naturalist Henry Walter Bates (played by Calum Finlay) works in his Amazon Drainage Basin workshop in Amazon Adventure (2017).  Bates sent specimens of 14,712 animal species (mostly insects) back to England, about 8,000 of which were hitherto unknown to science.

Photo_5-_The_CubertaFigure 2 Photo Credit: SK Films Caption: Henry Walter Bates (played by Calum Finlay) and Tando (played by Begê Muniz) on their sailboat called a “cuberta” in Amazon Adventure (2017).  Bates preferred to sail aboard a cuberta because he could both live on it and use it as a field workshop.  He could use it as a mothership by taking out a canoe on day trips to remote locations.

Photo_6-_Amazon_RiverFigure 3 Photo Credit: SK Films Caption: Here, we see the H.W. Bates cuberta sailing along the Amazon River as dramatized in Amazon Adventure (2017).

The Grass Isn't Always Greener
http://www.jamesarsalisbury.co.uk Copyright ©2016 James A. R. Salisbury, All Rights Reserved

Figure 4 Photo Credit: SK Films Caption: A brown-throated sloth reaches for tree vines in a tropical rainforest in Amazon Adventure (2017).  The film features fifty animal species.

Amazon Adventure is not included by Museum Entry (general admission) tickets and requires an additional timed-entry ticket. Tickets for films are available in Explorer ticket packages. For more information on Amazon Adventure and SK Films, visit www.msichicago.org and www.skfilms.ca.  One can buy tickets online in advance at https://www.msichicago.org/visit/tickets.  This time of year, the Museum of Science and Industry is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

The Museum of Science and Industry is located in the northeast corner of Jackson Park in the neighborhood of Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago.  It stands on 57th Street at the intersection with Lake Shore Drive.  The address is 5700 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60637.

[1] OMNIMAX and IMAX theater technologies were developed in the 1960s by the IMAX Systems Corporation of Toronto.  Known today as the IMAX Corporation, it is both a manufacturing company and a service company.  It manufactures IMAX cameras and projectors, produces films, develops IMAX film, and provides postproduction services.  At the time the Museum of Science and Industry built the OMNIMAX Theater in the Henry Crown Space Center, films were produced for the OMNIMAX format by the IMAX Systems Corporation, a consortium of science museum theaters, and other organizations.  In November of 2016, the IMAX Corporation and Marvel Television announced that the IMAX Corporation and ABC Studios would co-produce the series Marvels’ Inhumans, a spinoff of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., which would be filmed with IMAX cameras. The first two episodes will debut in IMAX theaters in September of 2017.  Episodes of the show will thereafter air on A.B.C.

“Martin Seay and Peter Ferry to Go Mano A Mano at Frugal Muse Books” by S.M. O’Connor

Frugal Muse Books, Music & Video in west suburban Darien, Illinois presents novelists Martin Seay and Peter Ferry going “Mano A Mano” on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  These authors are the winners of the Chicago Writers Association Novel of the Year Award.  This is a free event at which books will be for sale.

In 2017, Mr. Seay won the 2016 Book of the Year Award for Traditionally Published Fiction for The Mirror Thief, published by Melville House in 2016.  Originally from Texas, he now lives in Illinois with his wife Kathleen Rooney, a novelist and poetess.  He works for the Village of Wheeling and she teaches at DePaul University.

In 2016, Mr. Ferry won the 2015 Book of the Year Award for Traditionally Published Fiction Old Heart, published by Unbridled Books in 2015.  His first novel, Travel Writings, was published in English in the U.S.A. and U.K. and in Portuguese in Brazil.  Castle Rock purchased the movie rights.  Ferry taught at Lake Forest High School for twenty-seven years and wrote and edited textbooks published by Rand McNally & Company in the 1970s.  He is married and has three children.  His family resides in Evanston, Illinois and Palisades Park, Michigan.

Seay and Ferry will discuss everything from the idea phase of writing to the writing process to “publishing adventures.”  An audience Q&A and book-signing will follow.  Free refreshments will be provided.

Frugal Muse is located in Chestnut Grove, at the southeastern corner of the intersection of 75th Street and Lemont Road.  The address is 7511 Lemont Road, Suite 146, Darien, Illinois 60561.  The phone number is (630) 427-1140.

“Extreme Ice at the Museum of Science and Industry” by S.M. O’Connor

Extreme Ice, a temporary exhibit that documents global warming via imagery of shrinking glaciers, opened at the Museum of Science and Industry (M.S.I.) on March 23, 2017, and it will run through early 2019.  According to a press release from the M.S.I., the exhibit illustrates “the immediacy of climate change and how it is altering our world.”

American photographer James Balog captured thought-provoking images over a multi-year period that showcase the dramatic extent of melting glaciers around the world. Through stunning photographic documentation and time-lapse videography of these glaciers, Extreme Ice provides guests an emotionally visual representation of climate change. This exhibit encourages and educates guests on how they can make a difference in their daily lives.

Mr. Balog is the Founder and Director of the Earth Vision Institute (E.V.I.) and Extreme Ice Survey (E.I.S.).  Balog is the author of ICE: Portraits of Vanishing Glaciers.  He and the E.I.S. team were profiled in the P.B.S. NOVA special Extreme Ice and the Emmy®-winning documentary Chasing Ice.

In a press release, the M.S.I. stated the Extreme Ice Survey was “the most wide-ranging, ground-based, photographic study of glaciers.  Extreme Ice features the EIS team’s global documentation of glacier melt—alongside other hands-on interactive and informative elements—to illustrate what is happening around the world at a rapid rate.”

“MSI has a responsibility to our guests, schools and communities to showcase exhibits that present complex scientific concepts in an accessible way,” stated Dr. Patricia Ward, Director of Science and Technology at the Museum of Science and Industry. “Extreme Ice showcases James Balog’s beautifully powerful photography to illustrate the real and alarming speed at which glaciers are melting around the world. The exhibit presents a unique and emotional way to educate guests about climate change.”

An international team comprised of scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder and Trent University in Ontario, Canada has stated that almost 200,000 glaciers have been mapped and catalogued.  According to the National Snow & Ice Data Center, most of these glaciers have been retreating (shrinking) since the early 20th Century due to global warming.

Balog’s E.I.S. team has used time-lapse photography to document the shrinkage of twenty-four glaciers, as visitors can see in the exhibit.  The M.S.I. stated, “His team’s compelling and high-resolution footage places guests directly into settings such as Glacier National Park, Mount Kilimanjaro and the Alps, giving everyone a chance to see the real and alarming speed at which glaciers are melting around the world.”

“It is a privilege to showcase the Extreme Ice Survey at the Museum of Science and Industry, as it is vital to engage with new audiences about climate change,” Balog stated. “Photography is one of the most powerful mediums of communication we have; visual evidence illuminates our world in a way that nothing else can.”

Artifacts on display in Extreme Ice include equipment the E.I.S. team used on expeditions, such as insulated clothing, helmets, climbing gear, and a customized camera.  These illustrate for guests the physical demands the E.I.S. team members endured in remote locations and technological advances they made to take compelling pictures.

In the exhibit, visitors can also touch a seven-foot-tall ice wall.  This provides a tangible connection to the footage in Extreme Ice.  The M.S.I. stated the exhibit includes “maps showcasing the potential impact of coastal flooding around the world from New York to Shanghai, Copenhagen to London.”  Part of the exhibit is supposed to show museum visitors “how rising temperatures will affect Chicago.”  The Museum of Science and Industry promised visiting the exhibit was a chance to “Discover how bold individuals are single-handedly making radical impacts,” and “Understand the part they can play in mitigating the effects of climate change.”

Nepal NP-03 TL frame

Figure 1 Photo Credit: James Balog, Earth Vision Institute Caption: The fast-moving Khumbu Icefall, possibly the most dangerous route to the summit of Mount Everest, flows several feet downhill every day.

Birthday Canyon, Greenland ice sheetFigure 2 Photo Credit: James Balog, Earth Vision Institute Caption: This photo displays a river of meltwater formed by glacier melt in Greenland.

GL-7-08-003137_editedFigure 3 Photo Credit: Michael Brown Caption: James Balog poses in a hole called a “moulin” that formed when meltwater flowed into a crack in the Greenland Ice Sheet.

Greenland, July 2008Figure 4 Photo Credit: James Balog, Earth Vision Institute Caption: This is a close-up picture of a moulin.

Bridge Glacier, British Columbia, September 1, 2009Figure 3 Photo Credit: James Balog, Earth Vision Institute Caption: Bridge Glacier’s shrinkage contributes to the loss of over 5,800,000,000 gallons of water from British Columbia’s glaciers every year. This photo was taken in 2009.

MM8177 Bigger Thaw

Figure 4 Photo Credit: James Balog, Earth Vision Institute Caption: Over the past forty years, the Bridge Glacier has retreated more than two miles, with somewhere between 75% and 90% of its ice lost due to warming temperatures causing the surface to melt. This photo was taken in 2012.

Meltwater on surface of Columbia Glacier, Columbia Bay, Alaska, June 20, 2008

Figure 5 Photo Credit: James Balog, Earth Vision Institute Caption: As warmer temperatures heat Alaska’s Columbia Glacier, brilliant blue ponds of meltwater form on the glacier’s surface.

170324-PR-ExtremeIce-PressOpening-KC-75Figure 6 Photo Credit: Kasumi Chow, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Visitors to the Museum of Science and Industry’s exhibit Extreme Ice can see dazzling photographs of glaciers melting.

170324-PR-ExtremeIce-PressOpening-KC-53Figure 7 Photo Credit: Kasumi Chow, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: James Balog greets a young visitor at the opening event for the exhibit Extreme Ice at the Museum of Science and Industry.

170324-PR-ExtremeIce-PressOpening-KC-43Figure 8 Photo Credit: Kasumi Chow, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Visitors can learn more about James Balog’s work and how they can make a difference with interactive stations.

170324-PR-ExtremeIce-PressOpening-KC-35

Figure 9 Photo Credit: Kasumi Chow, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: The Museum of Science and Industry exhibit Extreme Ice features dozens of amazing photos of global glacier melt, shot by American photographer James Balog.

170324-PR-ExtremeIce-PressOpening-KC-14Figure 10 Photo Credit: Kasumi Chow, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Visitors of all ages to the Museum of Science and Industry’s exhibit Extreme Ice are able to touch a real seven-foot-tall ice wall.

170324-PR-ExtremeIce-PressOpening-KC-7Figure 11 Photo Credit: Kasumi Chow, Museum of Science and Industry Caption: Extreme Ice features a seven-foot-tall ice wall that visitors can touch.

The Aunt Marlene Foundation is presenting Extreme Ice.  Major financial support also comes from the Marlott Family Foundation.  The Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, The Buchanan Family Foundation, Connie and Dennis Keller, and The Wareham/Elfman Family also provided funds for the exhibit.

Extreme Ice is included in Museum Entry (general admission) tickets, which are $18 for adults and teenagers and $11 for children ages three-to-eleven.  One can buy tickets online in advance at https://www.msichicago.org/visit/tickets.

This time of year, the Museum of Science and Industry is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.  The Museum of Science and Industry is located in the northeast corner of Jackson Park in the neighborhood of Hyde Park on the South Side of Chicago.  It stands on 57th Street at the intersection with Lake Shore Drive.  The address is 5700 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60637.